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Nectar Eating Bats at your hummer feeders  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Fri Sep 21st, 2018 04:15 pm
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MountainbikeVH
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Mana: 
We just moved to Loma Del Mar and found droves of large bats to be feeding on our hummingbird feeders at night. I was so in awe I had to learn more.


For those interested, I contacted a bat expert (she's a post graduate biology researcher from Mexico City, now in the UK for more research) for info and advice. Turns out these are Lesser Long Nosed Bats (aka Tequila Bats), recently removed from both the US and Mexico Endangered Species Lists. YAY! I will continue to feed them now that I know.  After all, I am retired and have plenty of time plus sugar and water are cheap.  Here is other useful info received from my new expert source:
These are lesser-long nosed bats, also known as tequila bats. From what I can tell from the photos, you’ve got a young male and a female. These bats are probably on their way back to the center of Mexico after spending all summer in Sonora and Arizona, and your feeders must be a great find for them, helping them stay hydrated. These bats are the main pollinators of several desert plants as the saguaros and agaves but at this time of the year they depend more on fruits. They start their migration at the end of the spring from central Mexico and move to Sonora to find better resources and nice warm caves where they have their young. The fact that you photographed a young male makes me think that it was probably born this summer and this is his first migratory trip, so that extra juice will help him power up! It’s very interesting as well to see that it’s close to a female, these bats travel in groups and most likely close to their mothers who have to show them the way. So there is also the possibility that the two bats are related. Thank you so much helping them! They are amazing creatures! Please keep me posted on your visitors!

Some of them will be the same individuals, they use “transitional roosts” along their migration route for a few days at a time. These stop overs let them gain energy and rest. But eventually the temperature, the length of the day, and the availability of food will force them to move on.  




You can put the feeders back again the first weeks of May, and you will get the females migrating north. They will be suuuuuuuper fat!!! As they will be at the end of their pregnancies.

Attachment: Bats.jpg (Downloaded 95 times)

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 Posted: Sat Sep 22nd, 2018 03:40 pm
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Hook
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I find bats fascinating, too, but be aware that they are one of the leading causes of transmitting rabies, now that so many dogs are vaccinated for it. And, based on information from the US CDC, coming into contact with the mucous of these creatures can lead to infection. So, be careful when you handle your feeder, after they have been around it. You might want to wear gloves.


I take mine down at night. They can empty a full feeder in one night. I save that for the hummers.


Our feeder location in on the outside edge of our outdoor kitchen. The bats flying route to access the feeder often takes them under the patio cover over the kitchen/dining area. It's not screened in. I dont want to take chances on an accidental bite, as they fly around in there.


Just be aware that there is a danger with proximity to bats. 


That's one of the best bat pics I have ever seen, BTW.

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 Posted: Sat Sep 22nd, 2018 03:54 pm
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Jimmy
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They are Mammals.....

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 Posted: Sat Sep 22nd, 2018 08:05 pm
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MountainbikeVH
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Hook Post #2 - In order to ease anyone's concerns or fears, I wanted to share with you and everyone else current factual data regarding bats. This is more information from the bat expert I am in contact with. 


It is true that ANY mammal is a potential vector for rabies. But bats have had a bad reputation that is not based on true facts. The most likely vector for rabies in the bat world are vampire bats, and even in this species LESS THAN 1% of them are actually carrying the virus. These and any bats would avoid any contact with humans, so the cases of rabies that exist are usually in cattle. There are absolutely no chances that you will get bitten if you don’t handle the animal. They would not come near you, even if you get very close to them. It’s completely false that they would attack you or go into your hair. If by any chance you do have to handle one, for example finding one on the ground, use a towel and place him in a dark spot on a tree. Also don’t worry about disinfecting your feeders or treating them as biohazards. I would wash them occasionally to prevent bacteria growth and actually sickening the bats, but definitely wouldn’t worry about getting any diseases from them.

Thanks for wanting to learn more about these amazing mammals along with me. And thanks for enjoying my husbands picture, I have let him know. 
 

Last edited on Sat Sep 22nd, 2018 08:06 pm by MountainbikeVH

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