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 Moderated by: bartmanaz  
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odwyerpw
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Folks,

I will be taking the exam for Mexican Citizenship in two weeks. Just gathering the necessary paperwork has been an arduous process. A minor error in the spelling of my name delayed everything by about a year.

About a month ago, I started preparing with the Study Guide containing the 100 questions that has been used since 2008. During the exam, 10 of the 100 questions were chosen... the candidate had to answer 8 of them correctly.

However, I have learned recently that it has all changed. There is no Study Guide.  Instead there is one hyper-link: http://sre.gob.mx/component/phocadownload/category/16-nacionalidad-y-naturalizacion?download=159:guia-de-estudios that leads you to a PDF document with 4 sections that leads to about 13 other documents / webpages. Some of them have 337 pages, other 329, others 189, one is 54.. They cover everything from History, Gastronomy, Culture, Indigenous Peoples/Anthropology, Civil Topics. All in all, it's about 1200 pages of reading or more. 

There are no sample exams presented.  There is no collection of: "we will ask some of these 100 questions". Some have reported the new format is akin to playing trivial pursuit, rather than taking an exam that is a measure of one's understanding of key historical, cultural, civil topics.

I'm told the language exam is two parts... Spoken and Written. It is an exam, rather than a conversation. They still require you to know at least the chorus of the national hymn and a few verses.

So.. I'll report what I find in the coming two weeks. I've read that very few foreigners are passing this new exam. I really have no idea what to expect...

Last edited on Sat May 19th, 2018 01:55 am by odwyerpw

MARIGOT
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Well...good luck.  Thanks for posting the info about changes.


A couple of years ago, one of my friends went through the process and he was all nervous about the requirement at that time to give a speech in Spanish, only to have it waived on the exam day.


So hope they don’t have it all together in 2 weeks to give you the more arduous test.

odwyerpw
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I'm not concerned about the spanish at all.... Those two parts are fine.

It's the written history/cultural/civial/anthopology exam with 10 random trivial pursuit like questions pulled from 2000 pages of source material that has me nervous. How do you even prepare for that?

I started the process so long ago.... Had someone not made a mistake on my documentation... I would have taken the exam under the old format in 2017... Oh well....

kiteboarder
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I will be surprised if you can pass the test. I have read sample exams. Imposible. Best option is to wait until you are over 60 years of age and won't have to take the exam. I will be applying next week.
https://yucalandia.com/2018/01/28/jan-2018-update-to-mexicos-naturalized-citizenship-exam-requirements/

odwyerpw
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kiteboarder wrote: I will be surprised if you can pass the test. I have read sample exams. Imposible...
https://yucalandia.com/2018/01/28/jan-2018-update-to-mexicos-naturalized-citizenship-exam-requirements/



I read the same information. I am going to take my chances, as slim as they may be. It was soooo much work and expense just to gather all of the documentation necessary to apply, what's a few hours lost taking and failing an exam if that's what happens... 


60 is a long time for me to wait... I'm still youngish...

ballenamar
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I,m interested in your input. I have my permanent residency and am happy with that along with a USA passport. What advantage is there in getting a Mexican passport??

Last edited on Sat May 19th, 2018 09:33 pm by ballenamar

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Did you have to physically go to Mexico City for your background check?  Or how did you obtain that?

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You do not have to go to Mexico. Just get someone to handle everything for you. The fee is worth it. When I got my citizenship, , it was in Hermosillo. Exam was mostly history of Mexico, and holidays. Very big on the battles. Not that difficult, because I had children in the school system, and each holiday they got off, so was easy to remember the special dates. It has changed a lot since then (so many years ago).

odwyerpw
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LTR,
The exam is completely different now. I've seen at least 38 of the new questions. Quite different focus than the previous batch of 100 that was kicking around for a decade. Of course, I've never seen the exam you would have taken many years ago. Like Don mentioned, I'll be quite amazed if I pass the test on the first go.

Bill,
I suspect that I am probably 25-27 years younger than you, with at least another 17 years of work ahead of me before collecting social security, pension and using my 401K. Future income opportunities might involve import/export, might involve a few real estate transactions within the 50km zone without the hassle of a trust, who knows. I'd like to have freedom to pursue anything and not fret over future law changes for foreigners.

SharkBite,
I'm having someone in D.F. (I know it's not called that now, just Mexico City) retrieve the Constancia de Antecedentes, Nivel Federal, for me. I retrieved the Local on my own.

nice guy
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It's actually CDMX

odwyerpw
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nice guy wrote: It's actually CDMX


CDMX, as in Ciudad Mexico.... or Mexico City in English.... but I digress.

I came across something a bit vague that was initially explained to me incorrectly.

One requirement is to obtain something called the Constancia de No Antecedentes, Nivel Local y Nivel Federal.

We mentioned the Federal Background Check... Pay someone in Cd Mexico to do it for you.

The misunderstanding was the Local background check.  Local does not mean the Policia Municipal de Guaymas.  That's what I was told and that is the report that I requested and paid for. It does exist, but it's not what El Secretario de los Asuntos Exteriores wants to see.

Local refers to State Police, Nivél Estado. However, I need to go the local delegation of the PGR (Procuraduría General de la República.. yeah a federal level governmental body) in Guaymas (Ave 6, entre calles 19 y 20) to request this report from the State Police. 

Key is to google 'Carta de No Antecedentes Penales Estatales' to get the correct information.

Cool beans. One more trip. Who knew?

The other thing I learned... The day you apply... The day that you submit all of this documentation is the day you take the exam... The exam isn't scheduled... It is given to you the moment you turn in the paperwork and pay. Yikes...

Some of the reports are very time sensitive... For instance, For how long is a local or federal background check valid? 1 week? 2 weeks? 2 months? 3 months?  I believe it's 3 months. Some of my earliest documents were requested mid march and took 6 weeks to arrive, delaying my ability to request other documents. How much time can pass before taking the exam before those documents are invalid?

I given some thought, and I might like a bit more time to prepare for the exam, therefore delaying my final document submission by a few weeks. again, it will depend on how time sensitive these documents are.... I guess if it's 3 months... and it all starts 12 of March... well I have until Monday, 11 of June, to cram for that exam. Fun stuff.

Again, I'll report back on those details as well.

Last edited on Wed May 23rd, 2018 07:06 pm by odwyerpw

happy camper
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Thanks for sharing this with us odwyerpw. I am very interested in this since i will be next ..
Mine will be easier since i am older then you .

kiteboarder
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odwyerpw, wrong place - I went there. Probably I read the same thing as you did. You need to go to the Ministerio Publico on 14th or 15th (don't remember) one block right off of Serdan. Upstairs. Don't remember the exact requirements but take copies of passport, tarjeta de residente,and maybe Birth cert just in case. Passport photos as well. Handiwipes are helpful - they will take your fingerprints. Oh, and you have to pay first - at the government Hacienda office by the Banamex near Ley. Make a copy of that receipt. $129 pesos. Good luck. I am still waiting for my certificado de legal estancia from migración.


Oh, by the way, I am pretty sure that both of the constancias de no antecedentes are valid for 90 days but the certificate from migración is only good for 6 weeks. I think. 


Also, did you find a sample letter for listing your departures and arrivals to and from Mexico? The first time I went through this they didn't like how I did it and they did it for me at SRE, Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores,  and I didn't get a copy.

Last edited on Sun May 27th, 2018 12:26 am by kiteboarder

odwyerpw
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yup. Did not read your post until today. I went yesterday... wrong place.. but they directed me. 15th Ave about 1/2 a block back from Serdan. once I found the back alley, dark stairs and learned the secret knock they let me in. just kidding..  hilarious place though. I've been there before, about 6 years ago.. don't remember why but couldn't shake the déja vú. 

Foto Infantil, Tarjeta de Residencia Permanente and proof of payment (along with a copy) from the Agencia Fiscal (doubles as the DMV) across from Burger King... $129mxn. Easier and cheaper than the local municipal background check I mistakenly obtained before. No handiwipes … wish I had seen this posts... dirty fingers until I went to a restaurant to eat and washed my hands first ( a good custom that I've picked up here in Mexico)..

Last week, I sent scanned previews of all my documents to someone at SRE in Hillo. 12 documents in 6 emails (carta 1 de 6, carta 2 de 6, etc...). they made a few suggestions (as in you got the wrong local background check), but didn't comment on the salidas/entradas letter. so I guess it's ok? If they give me a sample I will be sure to save it for folks who might require it in the future.

They did not answer the question about the maximum amount of time I can wait to take the exam based on the dates that appear on my documents. The Police Report is the LAST THING YOU DO... after you have everything else in hand and it appears to have a longer life.... Where as the FIRST THING YOU DO.. appears to have the shortest life. I will ask again about the timing.

So far everyone I've encountered has been polite. Thumbs up for Guaymas public servants this go around....

Last edited on Wed May 30th, 2018 01:55 am by odwyerpw

odwyerpw
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On Friday, I received my Constancia de no antecedentes nivel federal from Ciudad Mexico. So, now I have everything in hand.

Repeated my question to Hermosillo... How much time do I have to take the exam. No response.

Pushed again today... how much time do I have? The answer? Get here tomorrow with everything in hand, prepared to satisfy all requirements, or it may be impossible to receive the citizenship. Quite surprised by that sense of urgency on their part, but those were the words... typed in all caps and bold.

Well, I'm in Alamos, so I guess I start the 5+ hour drive up to Hermosillo to turn everything in, pay and take the exam tomorrow.

MARIGOT
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Good luck...hope all goes well.  Safe travels.

long time resident
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Good luck!

happy camper
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Good luck to you and looking forward to hear about the needed requirements ..

odwyerpw
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OK. So how did it go?

So Hermosillo forwarded my application on to Mexico City because I met all of the requirements... including passing the exam. Wow. So now, I'm waiting 3 to 6 months for Mexico City to review the application and accept the recommendation from the Hermosillo Branch to grant me citizenship and make everything official.

The role of the local delegate of SRE (Secretaria de Relationes Exteriores) is to approve applicants and forward things on to Ciudad Mexico for final processing. Although Guaymas has a branch... they don't do naturalization... you have to go to Hermosillo for that.

Regarding the Exam... The questions were not represented in the Previous Exam's battery of 100 questions, nor the 38 for the New Exams that I'd seen in the last few weeks on the web. These questions were tough!  Some were straight forward, while others demanded familiarity with the myths, legends, stories of indigenous tribes throughout Mexico. 

So how does one pass?
1. Be the world's absolute best guesser!
2. Hope the tests are graded on a very generous curve.
3. Hope the results are ignored and just get credit for trying or showing up.

Jaja. But seriously, after 9 months of preparing paperwork, spending money and traveling extensively to obtain things, I'm glad my efforts didn't get harpooned by a short written exam.

Regarding the Language Portions.  Part I, a story with questions, done in the form of a conversation. Easy. Part II, select 1 picture from a group of 15 to 20 and describe what was occurring using 3 complete sentences. Easy. I'm sure I misspelled something, conjugated something incorrectly or made an elementary gender error, but I don't think they were looking for perfection.

I'm quite overjoyed... and exhausted.... Alamos to Hermosillo with all of the construction is really a 6 1/2 hour trip one way. I worked all day Monday (starting at 4:30am to match EST of 7:30am) and then made the trip.  Today, I attended to the SRE visit (paperwork and exam) and then made the return trip to Alamos. Well, of course I did a little eating and shopping in Hermosillo (purchased a couple of nice Angel Fish to add interest to the little fish tank I have filled with minnows from a creek near San Bernardo.. JAJA).

Tomorrow, I will make a post regarding a few lessons learned. I had some missteps... wasted allot of time (as recently as today!)... however, I also have learned a thing or two after 12 years in Mexico and did a few things right! I'll elaborate tomorrow. For now... I'm going to bed by 9 pm.

Last edited on Wed Jun 6th, 2018 04:31 am by odwyerpw

ballenamar
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Felicidades !!!!

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WOW. Now you can participate in all of the protests.

odwyerpw
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To be clear. I've now met the requirements for naturalization (status, documents, exam, payment, etc...) and the application, along with the recommendation from the SRE Delegation in Hermosillo, have been forwarded on to Mexico City. I can monitor the process online.

It's up to Mexico City to heed the recommendations of the Hermosillo SRE Delegation or not. Nothing will take effect until sometime between October and December.

So, yeah Jimmy I could still be deported for blocking traffic, waving banners and handing out flyers for Andrés Manuel Lopez Obrador or anyone else this month. JAJAJAJA. Passing through Navojoa on my return yesterday, my car moved through an intersection that had folks standing on the yellow and white lines. Young people tried to place flyers under the windshield of my moving car. I had to brake hard and stop as I was afraid someone could get a sleeve caught on the windshield wiper, or mirror... or get their foot under a tire... I'm not a fearful person, but man, someone is going to get injured by a car with this aggressive campaigning style...

Last edited on Wed Jun 6th, 2018 05:04 pm by odwyerpw

happy camper
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Congratulations, hope that everything will be right for you . Will all the effort you have put in you deserve it for sure.
Looking forward to the rest of how this all went.

Jimmy
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Are you required to renounce your current citizenship or will you have a dual.

odwyerpw
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I am not required to renounce, though I must state a willingness to do so if ever required. Well if that happens, I guess you think long and hard about which one of the identities you will renounce and where you want to live. 

Mexico doesn't want me to renounce as I'd be forfeiting benefits. They want me to collect my social security each month in 19 years (it's 67, not 65, for Generation Xers..) and spend all that money here along with my pensions and 401K savings. :)

By the time I have the documents in hand, I will have made another trip around the sun and be just that much closer to 50.. I don't think they have any intentions of making life difficult for someone who's getting close to being an 'old guy'. jajajaja

For almost six years, I've been doing work for a multinational corporation in some of thier plants in Canada, USA and Mexico . I'm hoping dual citizenship will enhance my opportunities.

What I am told, is that when in Mexico, it will be illegal for me to represent myself with any US documents (what they do about birth certificates, who knows?)…I have a Sonoran Driver's license of course, but I will eventually also have a Tarjeta de INE and a MX Passport. 

I must always represent myself fully as a Mexican Citizen. No using US Passports, Driver's Licences etc to bring in and operate a car from the USA ... I can't purchase tickets and board an airplane in Hermosillo using identification from the USA... that sort of thing is an absolute no-no.

They did not confiscate my Passport during the process. They did however keep the certified and apostillado copy of my birth certificate, along with it's official translation. So, I guess I will have to ask for one of those again from the State in which I was born.

<corrected for grammar and misspelling>

Last edited on Wed Jun 6th, 2018 09:55 pm by odwyerpw

MARIGOT
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One of my friends is a dual citizen and uses her Mexican documents when in Mexico and her USA passport when entering and traveling the USA.
Works out fine.


She acquired MX citizenship the easy way...she was born in Hermosillo to American citizen parents.  😋. No tests or government hoops to jump through!!

happy camper
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Thank you odwyerpw for the detailed explanation. It helps a lot for those who are interested in getting it also.

odwyerpw
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I mentioned that I would post a few basic guidelines.

1. First timer? Be humble. Bring a Bi-Lingual friend. But a smart, confident, bi-lingual friend who will ask thoughtful questions and seek clarification. Otherwise, it's blind leading the blind even if one of them happens to speak more than one language.

2. Always be polite. Exercise patience. This can be challenging. 
  • I remember renewing my FM3 (version of the Temporary Residency back in the day) for the 3rd time (you had to have it 5 years in those days to move to FM2 the Permanent Residency back in the day) and getting annoyed because the process required 8 trips to the immigration office. Finally, I asked "Why don't you folks provide a list of all requirements on the very first visit, so that only 2 are necessary?" I had a tone and of course in those days my Spanish was very 'direct' to say the least. A few minutes later they responded, "Another trip won't be necessary, everything is in order for you". The following year, going for my 4th renewal I stated, "This has been an arduous process. Aren't you glad that next year, the 5th, will be my final year getting this renewed?" The woman responded..  "No, this card is only a year old, you have 4 renewals remaining." Unknown to me.. the year before.. for my impatience.. the FM3 was cancelled and reissued... nullifying 3 years. A very hard expensive lesson learned. Don't be fresh, don't have a tone, don't display any sign that you are annoyed or have run out of patience.
3. Dress and Grooming are important. Foreigners, especially from the USA, have a reputation of letting their appearance go and being sloppy. It's a breath of fresh air in the immigration office when they encounter an American, well groomed, pants and shirts pressed, clean polished shoes, fresh breath, cologne, makeup, etc... This includes your paperwork, have it in order, no tears, no dog ears, etc.. (this one is tough for me because I've always had so much paperwork). 

4. Be gracious, especially if it's been a difficult process requiring many visits. On that last visit, where you receive your card..... Leave.. Go buy a cake at Suspiros… Return to the immigration office... Express your appreciation and gift them the cake.

OK, so those were all pretty obvious. Now, I'd like to relate a few very specific details. I'm always willing to spend a few more dollars for expediency. I would rather arrive with too many documents than too few. 

Here were some very specific things I encountered:

1. Get your name straight in the USA/Canada. This is soooo important. Make sure your passport, birth certificates, social security card, driver's licenses, bank accounts all coincide. Eventually, it will catch up to you if they don't... Especially on Mexican documents as you advance through the immigration and naturalization processes.
  • This was a major obstacle for me. As a younger man I changed my last night slightly... putting back the O' that my ancestors removed when they arrived to the US from Ireland so that they could avoid discrimination and find work. Computer systems hated the apostrophe, so I discontinued the apostrophe and just used ODwyer instead of O'Dwyer. I also disliked my middle name, so I often just used my middle initial W. But in fact, many forms only ask for your middle initial and not your entire middle name.  Finally, I am a JR, but often there's no place for a title on Forms, so the JR often did not appear on documents (Mexico had no idea what to do with a Title as a Suffix to your name). I literally spent 1 year correcting all of my US Documentation to match, even requiring written testimony that I was the same person. I spent another 6 months correcting all of my MEX documents, again requiring written testimony from Mexican witnesses. I also needed additional paperwork from the US Consulate. I also was required to present all passports and their copies, as there were slight variations to my name on each. The amount of certified copies, apostilles, and translations needed to correct all of this was mind boggling. Because JR was added to my Mexican documents as my Apellido Maternal (2nd last name), it nullified my CURP (which previously had an 'X' to indicate the 2nd last name... and I had to take out a new CURP.  I have yet to go through every single document at every gov't institution to correct every name/curp anamoly..... Whew, all of this over an O' , a W and a JR. Imagine if I had REALLY changed my name drastically! Lesson: Correct Your Name on Everything. Do it before you receive a single piece of Mexican Documentation that might not hold up later if it doesn't match.
2. Anticipate a few core documents. Bring them along with 2 copies of each. You won't always need all of these, but man while you are there in front of your own copier or that of a Papeleria, why not just spend a few pesos and make sure it's your 1 and only visit that go-around. They might be:
  • 2 Recent Bills at your Mexican residency (electric, water, or phone, none older than 3 months), 
  • Passport,
  • Current Tourist Card, Temp Residency Card, Perm Residency Card.
  • 3 months of bank statements. (one time someone asked me to translate my bank statements... this was done informally by me... I did not need anything official)
  • 4 foto infantiles each of your profile and front. ( I have an envelope full of them and I just pull out a few when needed... a little humorous as I've lost about 30 pounds since those fotos were taken).
3. Prepare a few core documents ahead of time. Somebody along the way is going to want to see your birth certificate and marriage license. Of course they want them translated too. By doing all of this well in advance, even years in advance, it removes pressure, as they are time consuming tasks. Get at least two because often when you submit the documents you don't get them back.. so get an extra for yourself. Do the following: 
  • Get two certified copies from the state of origin. (talking a couple of dollars)
  • Get an Apostille on those certified copies.
  • Get a State of Sonora or Federally recognized Spanish translation of those documents (for immigration state level is ok, for naturalization you need federal level.. if you think you will go naturalization someday.. then just start with the more expensive Fed translation from the getgo.).
4. If you've had your name changed (I'm not talking about through marriage):
  • Get two certified copies of the court order from the County of origin. YOu want to work with certified copies because you won't get this paperwork back from the Mexican Government.
  • Get those certified copies notorized.
  • Get an Apostille for those certified, notorized copies.
  • Get a State of Sonora or Federally recognized spanish translation of those court orders (for immigration state level is ok, for naturalization you need federal level. if you think you will go naturalization someday.. then just start with the more expensive Fed translation from the getgo.).
5. If you are applying for a work permit for a professional position. you might be required to show your College Degrees / Certificates. If so... Get them apostilled in the State or Providence and then later at the local Mexican Consulate. This prevents their authenticity from being questioned. Officials are cautious about blindly accepting your diplomas, degrees and certificates.
  • I have never been asked for a Translation. However, I had my Degree Apostilled both in New York and then the Mexican Consulate In NYC... All before ever presenting them to anyone within Mexico. I even have a Certificate from a program that I participated in Canada. That Certificate has a Apostille from Ontario, and then again later from the Mexican Consulate in Toronto. I was given this advice by someone and am so glad I heeded it.  It was a non-issue when asked to provide proof of academic credentials in the immigration office. No stress.. I had everything prepared well in advance. No one has ever asked about my high school diploma or my transcripts (high school or college).
6. When Exiting and Entering Mexico by car, have this documented on the Mexican Side..it just takes a few minutes in each direction. Unfortunately, border officials often do nothing, they enter nothing in the computer, stamp nothing in your passport, and then just hand things back. So, make sure the folks are doing this when you go through the trouble to stop and pop-in. Otherwise, your personal records won't match official records. You are asked to provide an accounting of your entries and exits. If they ever exceed 6 months in two years, you won't be eligible for citizenship. Don't leave the country while you have renewals in Tramite… It can nullify the process.

7. How do you get a copy of your CURP?  Head over to the Graphics place across the street from Immigation in Guaymas… For 20 pesos they will sign on to the government website and get you one... So much easier and quicker than trying to navigate the government website to get it yourself.

8. Don't hesistate to ask immigration to make a copy of the paperwork they are generating for you. They will tell you know... but just mention that you want it for reference because it has your signature... and that it will help you to keep the supporting documentation in order. They will never volunteer to give you copies of some of the internal documents they are submitting, but often will if you ask very nicely (and smell nice and are known to bring cake.. LOL).

My last and final advice is to think long and hard about your end game

Once you get working papers, permanent residency or citizenship you start making decisions about car purchases, paying taxes, etc... The processes are very complex, time consuming and expensive.

If you are content to just rent in Mexico, and derive your income from Canada or the USA, and don't mind a shopping trip in Tucson every 6 months (I mean you're driving to KM21.... why not).. well then I can't think of one single good reason to have anything other than a Tourist Visa...  Put Mexican Tourist Auto Insurance for your Vehicle for 1 year...but it from SanBorn in Nogales, AZ so that you can get the policy with higher limits... just seems safer. If saving additional money is important, then buy USA/Canada Auto Insurance that gives you the ability to put things on Hold while in Mexico (I could never be bothered with that.. GEICO is soo cheap). Every six months head up to KM21 and get a new tourist visa and car sticker... If it's an Arizona car.. do what you need to do with the registration (I think you can do 2 years in Arizona.. which means you are only troubled every 4th trip).

I hope this information helps some of you avoid a few frustrations. I have had a number of dealings because of my business as well. It's so important to keep all of your paperwork in order...



happy camper
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Wow, lots of information , for sure not an easy way to get the citizenship. It seems regulations changes depending your origin . I heard today from my Consulate (German ) that i would loose my Citizenship , since Mexico would ask me to renounce at my own . That of course will change my desire to go ahead with more paperwork.
Thank you for all your info ..

odwyerpw
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happy camper wrote: I heard today from my Consulate (German ) that i would loose my Citizenship , since Mexico would ask me to renounce at my own.
I would check with SRE. It's their decision to require renouncing of your primary citizenship or not. It might be that your consulate is just trying to discourage you? 

Just saying that I would have a conversation with someone from the Mexican Government. I may be wrong. In fact, I'm quite accustomed to being wrong. :D

Last edited on Mon Jun 11th, 2018 12:12 am by odwyerpw

happy camper
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Odwyyerpw , i may do so or the person who helps me with the needed paperwork may do it , but after reading all the official websites i got from them, it does not look that i have any change to get it without loosing my own.

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When I wanted to renew my USA passport, they asked me to renounce my Mexican citizen status. I explained that I had the Mexican and USA passport to enter each country with more ease, and that my first allegiance was to the USA. That satisfied them.

Now if I were asked to do the same by Mexico, which they never have in 3 occassions when applying at the consulate in the states, my story would change to satisfy them.

odwyerpw
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In typical fashion, after no real news for almost 10 months, we were given 1 to 2 days notice to attend the ceremony in Hermosillo to be awarded citizenship. Lots of last minute adjusting of our schedules for sure. Gotta love it. 


It was a brief ceremony, lasting no more than 15 minutes. 15 of us from 8 different countries were sworn in that day (including two folks from San Carlos). 

We each had to sign a few papers to surrender our Permanent Resident status, but that was the extent of paperwork on that day. No copies, no running to a bank to pay something. There was no saluting the flag, no reciting the himno nacional, no music, no prayers. Just a modest ceremony presided over by one government official. 

Last edited on Sat Apr 6th, 2019 04:02 pm by odwyerpw

odwyerpw
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So, what I have at present is a letter, 3 pages long.

Eventually, with that letter in hand, I can apply for a Mexican Passporte.

With the letter and Mexican Passporte in hand, I can apply for a tarjeta de Credencial Electoral.

When that is completed, it will be easier to consistently represent myself as a Mexican citizenship, despite my obvious Anglo/Saxon complexion and my suspect accent when speaking Spanish.

Regardless, at this moment, I am a Mexican Citizen.

I will continue to update this thread as I receive my Passport and Electoral Credencial.

will rogers
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To hell with all that. I'm going ask for asylum.

odwyerpw
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The Renouncing of Citizenship. What we learned is that this means that while you are in Mexico, you will always represent yourself as a Mexican, in accord with your citizenship, and not your country of origin. When in Mexico, you are Mexican.

When you return to your country of origin, you represent yourself as a citizen of that country. When in the USA, I will be a 'Murican.

When you travel abroad, well the choice is yours.

There is no actual rescinding of your American, Canadian, German, British, or whatever citizenship you originally held. You will still receive all of the benefits of being a citizen of your former nation (social security, healthcare or medicare, etc...)

long time resident
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odywyerpw, Glad you finally got through it. They will give you a birth certificate from Mexico. It will be longer then legal size, and that is what they use for your birth certificate in the future. You had mentioned something in your previous posts, so I thought I would clarify for you.

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Wife just finish the whole process also picks up her passport and voter card next week.

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Renewing your US passport will be a bit touchier

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not

odwyerpw
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long time resident wrote: odywyerpw, Glad you finally got through it. They will give you a birth certificate from Mexico. It will be longer then legal size, and that is what they use for your birth certificate in the future. You had mentioned something in your previous posts, so I thought I would clarify for you.


Kim,


I have to ask... Do I request it or does it just show in Hermosillo one day for me to fetch it?


I was told at the ceremony that I only needed the Letter that I received to get my passport. 

long time resident
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Bullshipper, I have renewed my US passport twice since becoming a Mexican National. I have had no problem at all either time. And renewing my mexican passport was done in 40 min at the mexican consulate. (while I waited), left with my new one.

Bullshipper
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long time resident wrote: Bullshipper, I have renewed my US passport twice since becoming a Mexican National. I have had no problem at all either time. And renewing my mexican passport was done in 40 min at the mexican consulate. (while I waited), left with my new one.



My experience was different. When I tried to renew my US P by mail, they requested a phone interview by letter.
They wanted to know why I wanted 2 nationalities, and if I had to give one up which would it be?


I responded that I was born an american and had gotten my Mexican naturalization to end the yearly cycle of applying for FM3's but that I would give up the Mexican passport if it endangered my US Citezenship.  


Then they asked me to submit current USA tax returns, again by mail.


After that they granted it, but the extra time inconvenienced my travel plans, and that's why I mentioned it.


When my wife got her USA nautralization, they confiscated her Green card. The problem there was we had also planned to travel right after her ceremony so we had to go to San Diego to do a one day application, and demonstrate why we needed to be back in Mexico using hotel reservations. Extra cost and worry of course.

Last edited on Tue Apr 9th, 2019 11:01 pm by Bullshipper

joejohnstun
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Wish I'd found this thread before I got naturalized. So much useful info! I just got my Carta de Naturalizacion last October, 2018.

I was wondering if anyone has info about paying your taxes after becoming a Mexican citizen (while still being a US citizen).

Do I now need to go to Hacienda & set myself up for double taxation? I work as a freelancer in various jobs, with no fixed, provable, or stable income.

What do you guys do with your Mexican/US taxes?

long time resident
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I make no money in Mexico, so I do not pay any taxes there. When I lived there, I paid my taxes there. There is no double taxation. If you made your money in Mexico, you file in the states, and say what you paid in taxes in Mexico for your income there. Never a problem. Now I just pay taxes in the states. No issues with transitioning.



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