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 Moderated by: bartmanaz Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
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Sailing to SC from San Diego  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Thu Jan 5th, 2006 07:45 pm
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FB
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Mana: 
I have been debating if I should post this or not, but here goes.  I will be sailing from San Diego to San Carlos next month.  I leave on the 18 and hopefully will take less then 2 weeks or I will be leaving the boat somewhere else.

 

Can anyone there offer any advice on where/who to contact on arrival (at either marina) ?  I would need to get a slip for a few days, and then arrange for a long term slip while I return to work (I know a 4 letter word) for a few weeks. 

 

Any hints on what to expect in terms of wind/waves in late Feb or early March?  I am not sure what path we will follow crossing, or if we will follow the Baja side then make the crossing. I am sure we will not make the most direct route as the winds never cooperate.

 

Any other advice on storing the boat or arranging transportation back to the US would be appreciated.

 


 

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 Posted: Thu Jan 5th, 2006 10:47 pm
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JZ
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Mana: 
I have been debating if I should post this or not, but here goes.  I will be sailing from San Diego to San Carlos next month.  I leave on the 18 and hopefully will take less then 2 weeks or I will be leaving the boat somewhere else.
>>  2 weeks is not enough time
 

Can anyone there offer any advice on where/who to contact on arrival (at either marina) ?  I would need to get a slip for a few days, and then arrange for a long term slip while I return to work (I know a 4 letter word) for a few weeks. 
>>  the marina office at Marina San Carlos can handle everything for you; they can arrange a slip, dry storage at marina seca, or mooring (not sure if any are available)

>>  you will need to get a 10-year import permit to leave the boat; this can be done in Guaymas at Aduana (customs); Marina San Carlos can do this for you for a small fee (highly recommended); it will probably take a week or more, as they will need to come out and look at the boat
 

Any hints on what to expect in terms of wind/waves in late Feb or early March?  I am not sure what path we will follow crossing, or if we will follow the Baja side then make the crossing.


>>  In the SOC the prevailing wind in the winter-time is North, Northwest; strong winds from the North for 3-5 days straight are not uncommon; waves will be very steep and short in these conditions;

>>  From LA PAZ to SC, people follow the Baja coast and then cut-over; the mainland coast is shoal south of SC; there are lots of ancorages from LA PAZ up to Santa Rosalia (due West of SC) on the Baja side

>>  For guide books, Jack Williams' (Baja pacific side and SOC) and Gerry Cunningham's (Baja SOC and SC) are the best resources

 

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 Posted: Fri Jan 6th, 2006 05:09 pm
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mexicomelklein
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Mana: 
Hate to dispute somebody but JZ is wrong.  Effective December 10th you no longer have to bond your boat into the Country

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 Posted: Fri Jan 6th, 2006 05:36 pm
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bartmanaz
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Mana: 
I want to clarify both comments about boat permits.  With the change to the vehicle free zone in Sonora, boat permits are not required as long as the boat does not venture south of Empalme on the mainland west coast of Mexico.  The entire Baja peninsula has long been such a free zone for both vehicles and boats.  So in the case FB presented in the original post, he does not need a boat permit as long he does not enter a port on the west coast of mainland Mexico south of Empalme.  Should weather or other issues make him enter a port like Tobalabampo, Mazatlan, etc, he would then need to get the permit there at the local port Captain office.

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 Posted: Fri Jan 6th, 2006 05:45 pm
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mexicomelklein
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Mana: 
Corectamundo.  No touchy mainland no permit needed.  Thanks for claification.

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 Posted: Fri Jan 6th, 2006 07:10 pm
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JZ
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Mana: 
I thought about that also, and in theory you don't need an import permit for use North of a certain point.  But I also read the marinas in SC still want you to have one to slip the boat.  Has anyone verified that they have changed their policy with the new rules.  And what happens if you are forced ashore unexpectedly south of km98.

I think as a general rule it is a good policy for a cruising sail boat to have a 10 year TIP to travel all over MX.  Many of the boats in LA PAZ have permits even though Baja has long been a free zone.
 

Last edited on Fri Jan 6th, 2006 07:46 pm by JZ

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 Posted: Fri Jan 6th, 2006 10:25 pm
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mexicomelklein
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Mana: 
This information was given to me by KiKi Grossman.  When I went to put my boat in last week at Marina Real at first they asked for bonding papers.  I told them they were no longer needed because of the change in the law.  They agreed with me and my boat is in a slip with no bonding papers.  I do agree it's a good idea for the sailboaters to have one, you never know where they could end up.  They don't even know.

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 Posted: Sat Jan 7th, 2006 01:44 am
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JZ
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Good info Mel.

 

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 Posted: Sat Jan 7th, 2006 02:12 am
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Vince Radice
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Mana: 
You could do this trip in two weeks but I hope you got a hell of a good autopilot a damn good engine and like to sail to weather!!!!. If you find after turning the corner in Cabo that getting to San Carlos is too much think about saling to mazatlan leave the boat at the marina mazatlan, great prices last time I was there, until the wind changes and then have a fun sail with the wind at your back!!!!! Mazatlan is well connected and would be easy to get back home in time for that four letter word called work!!!!

 

 

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 Posted: Sat Jan 7th, 2006 03:42 pm
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Miguel
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Mana: 
First... you didn’t say WHAT you’d be sailing down... or give your ability / experience... or size of crew. Sea conditions can get quite interesting mid Baja on the Pacific side... testing even experienced sailors... and driving boats less than 40 feet to the protection of the nearest safe anchorage.

I have to agree with JZ... two weeks is not enough time to make it to S.C. with any measure of safety -- time to wait out bad winds/weather, etc. And, without an experience crew for night passages... how could you possibly cover the 750 miles south to the tip... and 550 more up and across? At 5k that’s 260 hours (11 days) of full time sailing! Remember... the Baja HaHa takes two weeks to go from San Diego to Cabo... after Cabo, as JZ said... the northern winds coming down the Gulf can trap you in a hiding hole for 3 days at a time... so the weather does your planning (time setting) from Cabo north up the coast to Santa Rosalía.

Possible suggestion... could you trailer or truck your boat to San Felipe? The best sailing in the world is in the Sea of Cortez... if you could get here... Safely. Another thing to remember... many boats are left here (and put up for sale) because of the difficulty in returning -- up the Pacific -- to So. Cal... the return passage is not called the “northern bash” because it’s a party.

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 Posted: Sat Jan 7th, 2006 07:14 pm
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LimeyLInda
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FB

I agree totally with JZ and Miguel. This is not a "wife and two kids trip" I suggest you will need a well found and equipped boat with a crew of 4 ( as a minimum ) Two of the crew should be well experienced off shore sailors. and the other two with some experience. Two weeks is ambitious even then, unless you are prepared to sail in heavy conditions. Do not wish to "rain on your parade" but please be careful.

I ran into an old friend some years ago in the Azores, while crossing the pond. He had sailed from Capetown with his wife and two kids. They were all basket cases. Incidently, we averaged 9 k. from Miami to Ireland, with a crew of 4, with a 40 ft. racer, stopping at Bermuda and the Azores.  THAT WAS HARDEST WORK I HAVE EVER DONE.

Tony

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2006 05:43 pm
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FB
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Thanks for all your information... I have sailed a bit and expect to go as far as Cabo without stopping,, (I expect the winds to be from behind)... once at Cabo, I expect to watch the weather, and make it as far as La Paz for a first stop weather permitting, if not then the boat/crew might wait in Cabo for better conditions. I did not consider Mazatlan, that is not a bad alternative (close sailing in a breeze?) 

 

Either way it is expexcted to be an adventure.

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2006 05:56 pm
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LimeyLInda
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Mana: 
Good feed back, please post your experience, so the rest of us can enjoy your adventure. Wish I was sailing with you, it would be a lot of fun.

Take lot's of care

Tony

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 Posted: Tue Jan 10th, 2006 08:36 pm
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Miguel
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Mana: 
I'd like to add a bit of info to your thinking about stopping in Cabo...

This is the "on season" -- and you many not even find an overnight slip. A friend was chaged $100 a day (yep, one hundred bucks!) during the on-season... this is a very expensive marina and town to stop in.

I'd suggest you e-mail the Cabo Marina and check prices and availability...
http://www.cabomarina.com.mx/marina.html

Re the jump to Maz... easy, easy... downwind and downhill all the way... and quicker than the 150 mi. up to La Paz. I have friends that use the Maz Marina every year... very happy... and they feel very safe. Easy to catch a bus all the way into town. Next door... at the El Cid Marina... you'll find first class everything... a little more pricey... and the surge in this private marina can be something to remember...

Best of luck on your trip... Please keep us posted on your adventures and findings... Thanks.

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 Posted: Sun Jan 15th, 2006 07:24 pm
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JZ
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Mana: 
More on the subject of whether you need a TIP or not.  This is from a FAQ from Marina de LA PAZ.  They are basically saying if you intend to leave the boat in MX beyond the duration of your visa you need a TIP.

http://www.marinadelapaz.com/contenidos/frequent_questions.htm

1. How long can my boat stay in Mexico? All countries regulate foreign marine traffic within their boundaries, whether for commercial or pleasure purposes. Mexico's law allows an owner/captain to enter Mexico with a pleasure boat and keep it in the country for the duration of the original visit, which is determined by a "tourist card", which can be issued for up to 6 months.
Someone wishing to keep his boat in the country for longer than the original visa can do so by requesting a Temporary Import Permit (TIP) for up to 10 years. The temporary import does not change the registry or nationality of the boat; there are no taxes to pay or any other legal encumbrance. It is simply a permit to keep a boat in Mexico for up to 10 years.
It is recommended that you get a TIP at your first port of entry by going to the Customs office and requesting the "Solicitud de Importacion Temporal de Embarcaciones". In La Paz the process can take one week; in other ports it is quicker, so you should plan accordingly. The permit is also needed to import maintenance and repair parts and materials for your boat. The port of Ensenada has a one stop office where you can clear in to Mexico, get your TIP and immigration papers all in one place.

The forms must be typed or printed very legibly (outside most government offices you will find a stand where forms are sold and for a small fee can have the typing done) and submitted in duplicate, along with a copy of proof of ownership and a valid tourist card. Be sure to know where the hull number on your boat is located, to show the inspector. When you are given a stamped copy of your TIP, it will have a "Folio" number under which the permit will be registered. When you leave Mexico permanently, and don´t plan to come back the TIP must be canceled at the port of exit.


 

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 Posted: Mon Jan 16th, 2006 10:35 pm
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FB
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Mana: 
I am sure that we will end up with a TIP, not sure where to get it yet, there was never a plan to skip that.

 

My problem is that I have only 2 weeks off at this time, (late Feb) and need to get the boat (my friend's boat) at least to La Paz (or somewhere like that), where the paperwork can be done (he is retired so time is not a big deal).. the alternative is to sail to Ensenada, a week before our planned departure.

 

In a few months time I will be sailing on my own boat, again with a two week vacation.. I will meet up with him and hopefully make it all the way to San Carlos, presumable he will be ready to continue at that time.

 

In the perfect world, we would be able to make the entire journey to San Carlos for both boats at the same time, however he is not the most experienced and I am helping him "get his feet wet" on the first two weeks.  He has much sailing, but not any experience beyond an afternoon sail (many times).  So in the first trip, he will become accustomed to sailing at night and visiting unfamiliar ports and anchorages.

 

Believe me by the time we get to Cabo, he will have seen several dark nights and gained a respect for entering harbors.  Just entering Ensenada will be a real eye opener for him.

 

I have made many voyages down the baja coast, all or them non-stop to at least Cabo.  This will not be new to me.  I have also made many trips up the coast, stopping in many anchorages and dealing with personalities along the way.

 

My real lack of information and knowledge is to the North of Cabo and of course the new regulations on permits and visas.

 

I will report after my return, and keep notes. I don’t plan to make this a career, but the experience and knowledge might be of value later and to others. 

 

Thanks again for all the feedback I will check here for any other postings.  One question you people might be able to help with. Is there any radio frequency or channel (ham or VHF) that you all chat one? Or a Net like the baja-net?

 

Thanks again.

 

 

 

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 Posted: Mon Jan 16th, 2006 11:29 pm
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JZ
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FB wrote: One question you people might be able to help with. Is there any radio frequency or channel (ham or VHF) that you all chat one? Or a Net like the baja-net? 

Here is a link to a comphrensive run-down on the nets in Baja and San Carlos.  In San Carlos VHF 68 is used a lot for non-emergency communications.

http://bbs.trailersailor.com/forums/cortez/index.cgi?read=9798,Weather

That board is the most active board for sailing in the SOC.  Lot's of experienced people read it, however, the posting rate has dropped off a good bit in the last 12 months.  But if you post a question, I'm sure you will get quick and competent answers!

 

 

Last edited on Mon Jan 16th, 2006 11:32 pm by JZ

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 Posted: Tue Jan 17th, 2006 02:48 pm
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JZ
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Here is a great resource also:

http://www.cruisecortez.com.

It is the web site that got me hooked on SC and the SOC!

 

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 Posted: Wed Jan 25th, 2006 08:15 pm
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Hook
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Mana: 
Lots of good info here, FB. Just wanted to see if you had seen Miguel's recommendation of possibly having the boat(s) trucked as far as San Felipe. Not sure if it is feasible, but if it was, the trip would be a one-day drive to SF and a two-day sail, all downwind.

I read somewhere that the Grossmans of Marina San Carlos also have a trucking service that delivers boats supposedly all over North America. They would also be able to take care of all your paperwork. Maybe others can confirm if they still do this.

Last edited on Wed Jan 25th, 2006 08:17 pm by Hook

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 Posted: Wed Jan 25th, 2006 09:01 pm
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FB
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I looked at trucking the boat,, .. I would miss all the sights/experiences on the way....  (also it takes considerable time to de-rig and re-rig)

 

 

Last edited on Thu Jan 26th, 2006 02:18 pm by FB

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