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 Moderated by: bartmanaz Page:    1  2  3  4  5  Next Page Last Page  
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Temporary Residence Visa  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Sun Aug 26th, 2018 09:51 pm
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buffalobill
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Has anybody applied for a Temporary Residence Visa for living in Mexico for more than 6 months but not longer than 4 years? I'm finding out there are 2 parts to the process.

The 1st part begins at a Mexican Consulate in the U.S., for me that would be Tucson. If I qualify, they will stamp my passport with a 30-day visa stamp which permits me to visit Mexico specifically to get a Residence Visa. The 2nd part of the process of obtaining the Residence Visa happens in Mexico at the local Immigration office. I have 30 days to finish the process and they will give me one year. After one year, I go back to immigration and then they give me up to 3 years.

Has anybody done this? If so, is the Immigration office the same as the one located between Nogalas and San Carlos where I went to get my Visitors Visa (FMM)? I am wondering whether I can do this myself or if I will need an Immigration Lawyer?

Thanks, any info will be appreciated.

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 Posted: Sun Aug 26th, 2018 10:39 pm
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MARIGOT
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You can do it yourself.
Start the process at your nearest MX consulate in the USA, then come to San Carlos.  You can complete the remainder of the process at the INM office in Guaymas.  They have English speaking personnel and are very helpful.


If you don’t feel confident about your ability to navigate the system, call Rosa Mesa Andrews at (622) 226-0097.  She has facilitated the process for many residents here for a reasonable fee.  Her business name is Impulso, located on the north side of Beltrones Blvd, between CIBanco and Ernie’s Restaurant.


Good luck...

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 Posted: Sun Aug 26th, 2018 11:10 pm
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Hook
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Your description fits with what I had to do for a Temp.

But you can save some money by simply qualifying for a Permanente directly through proving financial well-being. The Temp is really only stepping stones to getting a Permanente, anyway.

At the end of the four years of Temp, you either have to go back to FMMs or on to the Permanente, as I understand it. I suppose you could also just get back on the four-year temp track. But that's just more money down the drain.

I dont know what the financial qualifications are for the Permanente but it isnt much. It can be a combo of an income stream like SS or a pension and/or a certain amount in the bank and/or owning a house of a certain value. You prove this at the consulate in the US. They should know that.

One caveat on the Permanente. You cannot drive a foreign plated vehicle outside the "free zone" with respect to vehicles. You cannot be issued a permit to drive a foreign plated car anywhere outside the free zone.

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 Posted: Mon Aug 27th, 2018 01:00 am
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SharkBite
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The immigration office where you complete your process is in Guaymas.  It's called INM.
It's across the street from the Ford dealership, up a steep hill to the office.

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 Posted: Mon Aug 27th, 2018 01:01 pm
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goldin
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We are on our fourth period of Temporary Residence Visa, so it’s not true you HAVE to convert to permanent residence after the first four years. At the end of the four year term you just have to start from scratch by going to a consulate. We did not want to go permanent because our car is Japanese and not importable. Besides we did not want to drive a Mexican plated car in the US. We spend at least six months in México and US.
The only thing to learn (which we just did) is that upon the end of your four years, you have to relinquish your temp visas at 21 on your way out(or let it expire). We forgot this year and when we attempted to start the process again in Denvers consulate they said NO because our visas where still active. Our painful mistake. We were unable to do anything at the consulate but try to schedule another appointment before we return to SC. 


You need to know that the consulate has a national appointment setting site, Mexitel, where you can set an appointment with them. Can’t talk to a human and whatever dates they show is all they have. We are now schedule to leave for SC at the end of September as the earliest appointment was 9/26. We normally leave CO at the end of August. We are very late in leaving because of the faux pas with the cancelation if the visa.



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 Posted: Mon Aug 27th, 2018 01:10 pm
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goldin
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What I also found out is that Tucson’s consulate does not go by the Mexitel system for a visa and you need not make an appointment for the crossing visa. You can walk in. Which is what we’ll do if the 9/26 appointment is not successful. It seems to be easier to get the crossing visa through Tucson, maybe because it’s a border town, etc. I never got a response from the Tucson consulate about what the requirements were for the crossing visa.


I also found out by contacting the immigration office in Guaymas, that you cannot cross the border with a 6 month or tourist visa to get a temporary or permanent visa. The process has to start at a Mexican consulate in the US. I think it has to do with their recording system. If your name is in their files as a 6 month or tourist visa, your status is active as such and you cannot request any other status, like temp or permanent.


Good luck.

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 Posted: Mon Aug 27th, 2018 04:31 pm
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buffalobill
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Sorry to hear about your misfortune golden. Soon as I call the Mex Consulate in Tucson, I'll let you know what I find out about the requirements for the crossing visa. Thank you for sharing what you experienced.



Best of luck to you too!

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 Posted: Mon Aug 27th, 2018 05:33 pm
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goldin
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Thanks, buffalobill.


One last piece of info to share is that the crossing visa is good for six months, at which time it’ll automatically expire. It’s a one time use kind of thing. It’s designed to allow you to cross into México one time for the purpose of processing your temp or permanent residence visa in Guaymas. One you cross, then it’s good for 30 days to complete the process. 

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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2018 12:38 am
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JCB
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Why are you bothering with any of this.   If you stay with an FMM, there are no restrictions on your vehicle and the only thing you need to do is go to K21 twice a year for a new FMM which takes 10 min and costs 500 pesos.  This you can do as long as you want since there doesn't seem to be any rule about how many FMMs you can get. 



In any case, everyone needs a trip to US Walmart or Home Depot at least twice a year.

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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2018 01:11 am
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goldin
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The only thing I would say about your perspective is that if it works for you, then by all means continue. 


My perspective tells me that I want to be honest, legal and keep a low profile while in a country where I’m not a citizen, just a guest. I was involved with the immigration Dept a while back in a case. The director there made it a point to take me aside and told me to tell all the Americans that “if you own property in Mexico you better carry the right visa”. I don’t know if and when they’ll start checking, but I don’t want to be surprised...

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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2018 01:53 pm
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stephenjay
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Good information everyone, I have been thru the process, a few tips, I found the MX consulate in Nogales just behind Pizza Hut much easier to deal with, show up with your passport, must have more than one year remaining before expiration, also show up with copies for the last 6 months banking statements, upon completion of the application, they will attach a 30 day visa to your passport, stop at K21 and get the passport stamped, within 30 days start the Temp Res permit process.

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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2018 02:40 pm
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Hook
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goldin wrote: The only thing I would say about your perspective is that if it works for you, then by all means continue. 


My perspective tells me that I want to be honest, legal and keep a low profile while in a country where I’m not a citizen, just a guest. I was involved with the immigration Dept a while back in a case. The director there made it a point to take me aside and told me to tell all the Americans that “if you own property in Mexico you better carry the right visa”. I don’t know if and when they’ll start checking, but I don’t want to be surprised...


And did he say what the "right visa" is for ownership in Mexico? Or can you provide a link as to what that is?

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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2018 03:10 pm
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jsprag
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I believe we had to produce a valid FM2 or FM3 to purchase real estate. Now I believe a Residencia Temporal or Residencia Permanente is required. As I remember at the time, and it may have changed, an FMM did not allow you to obtain a Trust

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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2018 04:01 pm
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goldin
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Thanks, hook. You’ve forced me into sone homework. I don’t want to go by my bad memory. I’ll check the laws and get back.

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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2018 04:29 pm
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Hook
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Apologies, Goldin.

I know many more people that got a trust with an FMT/FMM/tourist permit than I know people who got them with an FM3/FM2/Temp/Perm. It is very possible.

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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2018 06:50 pm
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Quido
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I have an FMM. I purchased real estate 8 years ago and received a trust. I didn't have to show anything.

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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2018 07:11 pm
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Steve W.
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goldin wrote: The only thing I would say about your perspective is that if it works for you, then by all means continue. 


My perspective tells me that I want to be honest, legal and keep a low profile while in a country where I’m not a citizen, just a guest. I was involved with the immigration Dept a while back in a case. The director there made it a point to take me aside and told me to tell all the Americans that “if you own property in Mexico you better carry the right visa”. I don’t know if and when they’ll start checking, but I don’t want to be surprised...


Splitting hairs, but most Americans in San Carlos do not own property, the bank does but we have control of it. I wonder if that changes anything about which visa is needed.

Last edited on Tue Aug 28th, 2018 07:12 pm by Steve W.

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 Posted: Wed Aug 29th, 2018 12:38 am
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goldin
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Ok I got some info, but first for the disclaimer. I’m not a lawyer or have any legal experience. My “advantage” is that Spanish is my first language and I can read the law without any trouble. That does not mean that I’m able to interpret and understand what it means correctly.


There’s like 200+ published laws in Mexico. In addition to laws there’s also regulations. As I understand it, the regulations state how to implement the laws. Don’t know if there’s a regulation for every law.


Here’s the link to the Immigration Law in Spanish. 
http://www.ordenjuridico.gob.mx/Documentos/Federal/pdf/wo83139.pdf
In here, page 30, chapter II, article 60, it talks about foreigners, independent of their status in Mexico, can have a bank Acct and purchase real estate.


It’s kind of a confusing article because under the regulation it implies that on,y temporary residents can purchase real estate. That’s next.

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 Posted: Wed Aug 29th, 2018 12:49 am
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goldin
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Here’s the regulation. 
http://www.diputados.gob.mx/LeyesBiblio/regley/Reg_LMigra.pdf


In Title 5, Chapter 2, article 107, Page 33, it talks about the applicant for temp residence needs to demonstrate some of these requirements: I’m not listing all, but the ones that are important to this discussion is that you need to show that you are solvent and that you have real estate and/or investments in Mexico.


The important distinction is that for permanent residence there’s no requirement to own real estate. I’m thinking that may have to do with the fact that to be permanent you must have already been temp, who has already met the re requirement.


Any if the experts are asked to comment...

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 Posted: Wed Aug 29th, 2018 03:50 pm
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buffalobill
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Hi Golden, you are confusing me. As far as I can tell so far, having real estate and/or investments in Mexico is not a requirement for me to obtain a Temporary Resident Visa.


Anyway, I phoned the Mex Consulate in Tucson and here is what I found out about the requirements for the crossing visa. Bring passports, marriage license,one photo passport size, letter of benefits from Social Security, one year's bank statements showing deposits. A couple needs to show a combined balance of $35,000 U.S.



The Consulate opens at 8am. No appointment is necessary but they said if you come in at 8am, expect to be there until 1pm, so come early.



This is a lot of research and hard work, but to be a guest in such a beautiful country, I know it will be well worth the effort.



Bye the way, there has been reference to K21 in some of the blogs. Can you tell me where and what that is? Thanks!



 

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